Celebrating #IndigenousDay

All events can be more engaging.

In particular, we’d like to see international events more inclusive and more beneficial for everyone by means of conscious, responsible, eco, sustainable tourism. Let’s measure how well this occurs at the two major conservation events taking place this year: the IUCN World Conservation Congress and the CBD COP13.

Today – the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples aka #IndigenousDay – we explore how these events could be more relevant by being friendly to Indigenous Peoples. The following slides are a wish list for discussion and evaluation before, during and after the event. Please pay attention to #6.

 

Wishlist: World Conservation Congress http://planeta.wikispaces.com/iucn2016#wishlist … @IUCN @IUCN_CEC @aloha_nature #IUCNCongress #Hawaii

2016 World Conservation Congress Wish List

1) We’d like to learn about conservation
2) We’d like the WCC to be a window into the IUCN
3) We’d like the WCC to be fully engaged via the social web

4) We’d like the WCC to engage locals in Hawai’i and teach visitors about Hawai’i
5) We’d like the WCC to be a catalyst for satellite events and viewing parties
6) We’d like the WCC to be particularly friendly to Indigenous Peoples
7) We’d like the WCC to serve as an example of responsible travel embedded in conservation events
8) We’d like the WCC to serve as an example of Open Access, Open Educational Resources and Open Journalism

 

Wishlist: Thirteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties (#CBDCOP13 #COP13) @CBDNews @COP13mx @SEMARNAT_mx @conabio @clalyc

COP 13 Wish List

1) We’d like to learn about biodiversity
2) We’d like COP13 to be a window into the CBD and partners
3) We’d like COP13 to be fully engaged via the social web

4) We’d like COP13 to engage locals in México and teach visitors about México
5) We’d like COP13 to be a catalyst for satellite events and viewing parties
6) We’d like COP13 to be particularly friendly to Indigenous Peoples and local communities
7) We’d like COP13 to serve as an example of responsible travel embedded in conservation events
8) We’d like COP13 to serve as an example of Open Access,Open Education and Open Journalism

 

One of my newest #roofdog posters poses the question:  How do you translate ‘International Day of the World’s Indigenous People?’ = ¿Cómo se traduce ‘Día Internacional de los Pueblos Indígenas?’

Conservation events can be friendly to Indigenous Peoples by making each day a celebration of #IndigenousDay. Can you imagine the impact of a public-facing, Indigenous-friendly event?

First, there needs to be integration of Indigenous peoples (local and global) into the program planning. Second, the workshops and presentations need to be available via livestreaming video and interaction with those outside the conference hall. We’re not just seeking the keynote addresses. Show us the pre-event planning. Third, side events and field trips from the conference should take visitors into the field and provide face-to-face interaction.

Summing up – this year’s major conservation events can be catalysts for greater understanding and empathy if we learn (and retweet) a bit of Hawaiian and Mayan.#UsaTuVoz (use your voice).

Comments and observations welcome on this blog. We’ll report lessons learned from these events during February’s Responsible Travel Week.

Stray Observations
Friday we’re talking about elephants
Red flags from events are the use of photos of anonymous Indigenous Peoples in presentations and promotion.

Twitter Shoutout: @CBDNews @COP13mx @SEMARNAT_mx @conabio @clalyc @biodivcivsoc

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