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National Climate Assessment #nca4

Recommended Reading: Climate Science Special Report Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4), Volume I, the first of two volumes of the Fourth National Climate Assessment, mandated by the Global Change Research Act of 1990.

Key Links
https://science2017.globalchange.gov
https://science2017.globalchange.gov/downloads/CSSR2017_FullReport.pdf
https://twitter.com/usgcrp

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Summary
New observations and new research have increased our understanding of past, current, and future climate change since the Third U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA3) was published in May 2014. This Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) is designed to capture that new information and build on the existing body of science in order to summarize the current state of knowledge and provide the scientific foundation for the Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4).

Since NCA3, stronger evidence has emerged for continuing, rapid, human-caused warming of the global atmosphere and ocean. This report concludes that “it is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century. For the warming over the last century, there is no convincing alternative explanation supported by the extent of the observational evidence.”

The last few years have also seen record-breaking, climate-related weather extremes, the three warmest years on record for the globe, and continued decline in arctic sea ice. These trends are expected to continue in the future over climate (multidecadal) timescales. Significant advances have also been made in our understanding of extreme weather events and how they relate to increasing global temperatures and associated climate changes. Since 1980, the cost of extreme events for the United States has exceeded $1.1 trillion; therefore, better understanding of the frequency and severity of these events in the context of a changing climate is warranted.

Key Findings: Temperature Changes in the USA

  1. Annual average temperature over the contiguous United States has increased by 1.2°F (0.7°C) for the period 1986–2016 relative to 1901–1960 and by 1.8°F (1.0°C) based on a linear regression for the peri- od 1895–2016 (very high confidence). Surface and satellite data are consistent in their depiction of rapid warming since 1979 (high confidence). Paleo-temperature evidence shows that recent decades are the warmest of the past 1,500 years (medium confidence).
  2. There have been marked changes in temperature extremes across the contiguous United States. The frequency of cold waves has decreased since the early 1900s, and the frequency of heat waves has increased since the mid-1960s. The Dust Bowl era of the 1930s remains the peak period for extreme heat. The number of high temperature records set in the past two decades far exceeds the number of low temperature records. (Very high confidence)
  3. Annual average temperature over the contiguous United States is projected to rise (very high confidence). Increases of about 2.5°F (1.4°C) are projected for the period 2021–2050 relative to 1976–2005 in all RCP scenarios, implying recent record-setting years may be “common” in the next few decades (high confidence). Much larger rises are projected by late century (2071–2100): 2.8°–7.3°F (1.6°–4.1°C) in a lower scenario (RCP4.5) and 5.8°–11.9°F (3.2°–6.6°C) in the higher scenario (RCP8.5) (high confidence).
  4. Extreme temperatures in the contiguous United States are projected to increase even more than aver- age temperatures. The temperatures of extremely cold days and extremely warm days are both expect- ed to increase. Cold waves are projected to become less intense while heat waves will become more intense. The number of days below freezing is projected to decline while the number above 90°F will rise. (Very high confidence)

Background
What is the National Climate Assessment?: The National Climate Assessment (NCA), mandated under the Global Change Research Act of 1990, is a major product of the US Global Change Research Program. This quadrennial assessment is an important resource for understanding and communicating climate change science and impacts in the United States. It informs the Nation about observed changes, the current status of the climate, and anticipated trends for the future. The NCA process integrates scientific information from multiple sources and sectors to highlight key findings and significant gaps in our knowledge. NCA findings provide input to Federal science priorities and are used by policymakers, communities, and businesses as they navigate the challenges of climate and global change.

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