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Hopi Festival 2018

Poster

Kudos to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) for livestreaming and archiving videos from the Hopi Festival 2018 and many thanks to the organizers and presenters for sharing experiences and wisdom with Rasmuson Theater and the world. NMAI is on the top of our list of places to visit in Washington, DC.

The festival presentations were webcast and recorded November 18, 2018.

This festival is presented with the generous support of the Luce Foundation.

Key Links
Program Information

Questions

  • Who are the Hopi voices to follow on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and other social web channels?
  • In terms of tourism, what are the recommended Hopi places and services?
  • 2019 is the International Year of Indigenous Languages. What is the status of the Hopi language?
  • Will there be a Hopi Festival 2019?

Videos

The history of the Hopi

For the first festival hosted by the National Museum of the American Indian, the Hopi people shared artist demonstrations, history presentations, and performances of music and dance. Bruce Talawyma gives a talk on the history and culture of the Hopi people and shows a short video on the Hopi way of life.

Hopi Code Talkers

For the first festival hosted by the National Museum of the American Indian, the Hopi people shared artist demonstrations, history presentations, and performances of music and dance. In this segment, Eugene Talas gives a talk on Hopi veterans and the Code Talkers. The Code Talkers came from several American Indian tribes, including the Hopi, and they provided unbroken coded communications during wartime based on American Indian languages.

Alternative History of America

For the first festival hosted by the National Museum of the American Indian, the Hopi people shared artist demonstrations, history presentations, and performances of music and dance. Edward Kabotie gives a Alternative History of America, based on a Hopi perspective. His presentation is illustrated through original songs and art created by himself and his father.

Qaʼ ö — Hopi Corn Dance

For the first festival hosted by the National Museum of the American Indian, the Hopi people shared artist demonstrations, history presentations, and performances of music and dance. Hopi dancers and singers demonstrate the Qaʼ ö, or Hopi Corn Dance. Bruce Talawyma gives insightful remarks about the performance and the meaning and importance of the dance for the Hopi.

About the Hopi
NMAI: The Hopi Tribe is a sovereign nation located in northeastern Arizona. Their reservation encompasses more than 1.5-million acres, and is made up of 12 villages on three mesas.

Since time immemorial the Hopi people have lived in Hopitutskwa, knowledge and respect for the earth, and they continue to maintain a sacred covenant with Maasaw, its ancient caretaker, to live as peaceful and humble farmers. Over the centuries Hopi endures as a tribe, retaining its culture, language, and religion despite influences from the outside world. During their festival, the Hopi people will share artist demonstrations, history presentations, and performances of music and dance.

Potomac Atrium
Welcome and Presentation of Colors
Weaving | Harold Lomayaktewa
Veterans | Eugene Talas
Hopi tourism | Bertram Tsavadawa
Pottery | Vernida Polacca
Basketry | Alvina Lynn Thompson
Silversmithing | Willis Humeyestewa
Carving | Tate Rex Yoiwyma Sr. & Tate Rex Yoiwyma Jr.
Painting | Duane Koyawena
Basketry | Roberta Honwaima

Rasmuson Theater
Qaʼ ö | Hopi Corn Dance
The History of Hopi | Bruce Talawyma
Run Hopi (film, 15 min.) | Rickey Gene Baker
Wuyak Voli | Hopi Big Butterfly Dance
Hopi Code Talkers | Eugene Talas
The History of Hopi | Bruce Talawyma
Nygumon Tota | Hopi Corn Grinding Dance
Alternative History of America | Edward Kabotie
Pavalhik | Hopi Water Maiden Dance

imagiNATIONS Activity Center
Hopi gourd pendants
Storybook readings

Twitter
@SmithsonianNMAI
@TheHopiTribe
@HLuceFdn

Embedded Tweets

Planeta.com

Hopi

National Museum of the American Indian

Museums

Washington, DC

2019 – International Year of Indigenous Languages

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