home Australia Voice. Treaty. Truth. NAIDOC Week 2019

Voice. Treaty. Truth. NAIDOC Week 2019

Poster: Charmaine Mumbulla, National NAIDOC Poster Competition

NAIDOC Week celebrations are held across Australia each July to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. 2019 dates: July 7-14. Hashtags: #NAIDOC2019, #NAIDOCWeek.

Key Links
naidoc.org.au
Charmaine Mumbulla
2019 National NAIDOC Poster
@naidocweek

Announcement from NAIDOC:
Source: Voice. Treaty. Truth.
We invite you to walk with us in a movement of the Australian people for a better future.

The Indigenous voice of this country is over 65,000 plus years old.

They are the first words spoken on this continent. Languages that passed down lore, culture and knowledge for over millennia. They are precious to our nation.

It’s that Indigenous voice that include know-how, practices, skills and innovations – found in a wide variety of contexts, such as agricultural, scientific, technical, ecological and medicinal fields, as well as biodiversity-related knowledge.  They are words connecting us to country, an understanding of country and of a people who are the oldest continuing culture on the planet.

And with 2019 being celebrated as the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages, it’s time for our knowledge to be heard through our voice.

For generations, we have sought recognition of our unique place in Australian history and society today. We need to be the architects of our lives and futures.

For generations, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have looked for significant and lasting change.

Voice. Treaty. Truth. were three key elements to the reforms set out in the Uluru Statement from the Heart. These reforms represent the unified position of First Nations Australians.

However, the Uluru Statement built on generations of consultation and discussions among Indigenous people on a range of issues and grievances. Consultations about the further reforms necessary to secure and underpin our rights and to ensure they can be exercised and enjoyed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

It specifically sequenced a set of reforms: first, a First Nations Voice to Parliament enshrined in the Constitution and second, a Makarrata Commission to supervise treaty processes and truth-telling.

(Makarrata is a word from the language of the Yolngu people in Arnhem Land. The Yolngu concept of Makarrata captures the idea of two parties coming together after a struggle, healing the divisions of the past. It is about acknowledging that something has been done wrong, and it seeks to make things right.)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people want their voice to be heard. First Nations were excluded from the Constitutional convention debates of the 1800’s when the Australian Constitution came into force.  Indigenous people were excluded from the bargaining table.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have always wanted an enhanced role in decision-making in Australia’s democracy.

In the European settlement of Australia, there were no treaties, no formal settlements, no compacts. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people therefore did not cede sovereignty to our land. It was taken away from us. That will remain a continuing source of dispute.

Our sovereignty has never been ceded – not in 1788, not in 1967, not with the Native Title Act, not with the Uluru Statement from the Heart. It coexists with the sovereignty of the Crown and should never be extinguished.

Australia is one of the few liberal democracies around the world which still does not have a treaty or treaties or some other kind of formal acknowledgement or arrangement with its Indigenous minorities.

A substantive treaty has always been the primary aspiration of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander movement.

Critically, treaties are inseparable from Truth.

Lasting and effective agreement cannot be achieved unless we have a shared, truthful understanding of the nature of the dispute, of the history, of how we got to where we stand.

The true story of colonisation must be told, must be heard, must be acknowledged.

But hearing this history is necessary before we can come to some true reconciliation, some genuine healing for both sides.

And of course, this is not just the history of our First Peoples – it is the history of all of us, of all of Australia, and we need to own it.

Then we can move forward together.

Let’s work together for a shared future.

Source: NAIDOC 2019: Uluru embodies journey towards a shared future.

Charmaine Mumbulla, a proud Kaurna and Narungga woman, is this year’s winner of the prestigious National NAIDOC Poster Competition.

Ms Mumbulla’s artwork ‘Awaken’ was judged by the National NAIDOC Committee to have best captured the spirit of the 2019 NAIDOC theme: Voice. Treaty. Truth – Let’s work together for a shared future.

Ms Mumbulla’s artwork depicts an early dawn light rising over Uluru, symbolising continued spiritual and unbroken connection to the land. The circles at the base of Uluru represent the historic gathering in May 2017 of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders, who adopted the Uluru Statement from the Heart.

This year, NAIDOC Week invites all Australians to walk in a movement for a better future through raising a greater national awareness of the three key elements to the reforms set out in the Uluru Statement.

Arising out of the 2017 national gathering of First Nations representatives, the Uluru Statement represented the unified position and specifically sequenced a set of reforms: first, a First Nations voice to Parliament enshrined in the Constitution and second, a Makarrata Commission to supervise treaty processes and truth-telling.

NAIDOC Week also celebrates that 2019 is the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages aims to promote and acknowledge Indigenous languages or ‘voice’ as the first words spoken on this continent and the 65,000 plus year-old voice of this country.

Ms Mumbulla will have her artwork displayed on the 2019 National NAIDOC Poster and receives a $10,000 prize. With over 100,000 posters printed, the National NAIDOC posters are distributed across the country from schools, kindergartens and universities to Government Departments, corporates and shopping centres. The winning artist’s work will also feature on the front cover of NAIDOC Week education resources being produced by the Special Broadcasting Service Corporation (SBS). These resources will be available to schools nationally in early June as printed resources and accompanied by an online suite of materials via the SBS Learn website.

The iconic NAIDOC poster has been celebrating and promoting NAIDOC Week since the late 1960s and rose to national prominence in the 1970s with the establishment of the Indigenous rights movement.

Ms Mumbulla has a background as a lawyer as well as in education and graphic design. She runs a creative agency called Mumbulla Creative.

Elsewhere on the Web
https://www.abc.net.au/indigenous

Previously

NAIDOC Week 2018

Our Languages Matter: NAIDOC Week 2017

NAIDOC

Planeta.com

Australia

Aboriginal and Indigenous Australia

07 • July • Julio

2019 – International Year of Indigenous Languages

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